Simple stay-home recipes: Naturally-dyed Ramen Easter Eggs using Poland’s Woźniak eggs

I remember dyeing eggs for Easter as a young schoolgirl, but I never understood its significance until I grew up. 

For thousands of years, people have associated eggs with rebirth, new life and fertility, but we now commonly associate it with the resurrection of Jesus Christ, which is celebrated on Easter. Traditionally, Easter eggs are stained red to represent the blood that Christ shed on the cross, but overtime, this tradition has evolved to include much more colours like yellow, purple, blue and green.

Close up of Fermy Wozniak eggs

In an attempt to recreate my childhood memories of dyeing eggs for Easter, I discovered these white eggs that hail from the largest egg producer in Poland, Fermy Woźniak

These white eggs are GMO free and antibiotics free, and go through a fully integrated closed-cycle production line with absolute control over every stage of the process— from parent flocks, hatcheries, a high-quality fodder factory, to packaging and even transport of eggs.

While white and brown eggs hold no difference in terms of nutrients, I decided to go with white eggs for this recipe. Not only is it fantastic for egg dyeing because the dye colours will turn out more vibrant as compared to that on brown eggs, white is also associated with purity and grace— how apt for Easter, which celebrates the resurrection of Christ!

Close up of Fermy Wozniak eggs

Here’s the best part— these Polish eggs are available in Singapore and you can find them at your local supermarket or retail store. To identify whether you’re buying authentic Polish eggs, look for the unique serial number on each egg. It’s stamped in bright red ink and should start with either “3PL” or “2PL”, so you definitely won’t be able to miss it. 

In celebration of Easter, we’ve come up with a perfect family activity for you and the kids— how to dye Easter eggs with natural ingredients. And of course, to put our own SethLui.com spin on it, we’re making ramen eggs with a runny centre.

It’s time to put your aprons on, because it’s about to get messy!

Naturally-dyed Ramen Easter Eggs

Photo of ingredients

Ingredients

  • 10 unpeeled white eggs from Fermy Wozniak
  • Water
  • Ice
  • 2 tbsp distilled white vinegar (per dye)
  • Pink: 1 large dragon fruit
  • Yellow: 1 tsbp ground turmeric
  • Green: 2 tsbp matcha powder
  • Blue: 1 red cabbage, sliced
  • Violet: 30g butterfly pea flower

Tools

  • Pots
  • Blender
  • Spoon
  • Mesh strainer
  • Kitchen towels
  • Ziplock bags
  • Small bowls

Recipe preparation

Preparation time: 15 minutes; Cooking time: 45 – 60 minutes; Resting time: 60 minutes till overnight
Makes 10 eggs

Boiling the eggs

Photo of placing eggs into pot

Step 1: Bring 4 cups of water to a hard boil, then lower to a medium heat. Add the eggs gently with a spoon.

Photo of setting timer

Step 2: Set the timer for 6 minutes. If you prefer your eggs a little more set, go for 6 minutes 15 seconds.

Photo of placing eggs in ice bath

Step 3: After the timer is up, take the eggs out and place them in a bowl of iced water. Let the eggs sit till they’re cool to the touch.

Photo of drying eggs

Step 4: Drain the water and gently dry the eggs by rubbing it with a washcloth, kitchen towel or thumb to remove oils that prohibit the natural dyes from adhering effectively to the eggshell.

Making the natural dyes

Pink (dragon fruit)

Photo of scooping out dragon fruit

Step 1: Scoop the dragon fruit flesh into a blender.

Photo of blending dragon fruit

Step 2: Blend till smooth.

Photo of pouring dragon fruit dye through a metal strainer

Close up of dragon fruit dye

Step 3: Strain the dragon fruit mixture through a sieve. Use a pestle or spoon to speed up the process.

Photo of pouring water into dragon fruit dye

Step 4: If the mixture is too thick, add some water and mix well.

Photo of adding vinegar into dragon fruit dye

Step 5: Add two tablespoons of white vinegar to the mixture.

Photo of pouring dragon fruit dye into ziplock bag

Step 6: Pour the mixture into a ziplock bag and set aside.

Yellow (turmeric powder)

Photo of adding turmeric powder into boiling water

Step 1: Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and pour in the turmeric powder.

Close up of turmeric dye

Step 2: Turn the heat down to low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the desired colour is reached.

Step 3: Once the desired colour is reached, switch off the heat.

Photo of adding turmeric dye into ziplock bag

Step 4: Pour the mixture into a ziplock bag.

Photo of adding vinegar into turmeric dye

Step 5: Add two tablespoons of white vinegar to the mixture and set aside.

Step 6: Let the mixture cool for about 60 minutes or until cool to the touch.

Green (matcha powder)

Photo of adding matcha powder to pot of boiling water

Step 1: Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and pour in the matcha powder.

Close up of matcha powder in boiling water

Step 2: Turn the heat down to low and simmer for 5 minutes, or until the desired colour is reached.

Step 3: Once the desired colour is reached, switch off the heat.

Close up of pouring matcha powder dye into ziplock bag

Step 4: Pour the mixture into a ziplock bag.

Step 5: Add two tablespoons of white vinegar to the mixture and set aside.

Step 6: Let the mixture cool for about 60 minutes or until cool to the touch.

Blue (red cabbage)

Photo of placing red cabbage into boiling water

Step 1: Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and pour in the sliced red cabbage.

Close up of red cabbage in boiling water

Step 2: Turn the heat down to low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the desired colour is reached.

Step 3: Once the desired colour is reached, switch off the heat.

Close up of pouring red cabbage dye into ziplock bag

Step 4: Pour the mixture into a ziplock bag.

Photo of adding vinegar into butterfly blue pea dye

Step 5: Add two tablespoons of white vinegar to the mixture and set aside.

Step 6: Let the mixture cool for about 60 minutes or until cool to the touch.

Violet (butterfly pea flower + vinegar)

Photo of butterfly blue pea in boiling pot

Step 1: Bring 2 cups of water to a boil and pour in the butterfly pea flower.

Photo of butterfly blue pea in boiling pot

Step 2: Turn the heat down to low and simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, or until the desired colour is reached.

Step 3: Once the desired colour is reached, switch off the heat.

Close up of pouring butterfly blue pea dye into ziplock bag

Step 4: Pour the mixture into a ziplock bag. If you need to, use a mesh strainer.

Close up of adding vinegar to red cabbage

Step 5: To make the mixture turn violet, add two tablespoons of white vinegar to the mixture and set aside.

Step 6: Let the mixture cool for about 60 minutes or until cool to the touch.

Dyeing the eggs

Photo of dye

Step 1: Take out your ziplock bags and make sure that all the mixtures are cool to the touch. This is to avoid them cooking the ramen eggs any further.

Photo of adding eggs into dye

Photo of adding eggs into dye

Step 2: Lower the eggs into the ziplock bags.

Photo of placing eggs into the fridge

Step 3: Place the ziplock bags in the fridge and soak until the desired colour is reached. This can range from 60 minutes to overnight, depending on how vivid you’d like the colour to be.

Close up of drying eggs

Step 4: When the eggs are ready, scoop them out with a spoon or tongs.

Close up of drying eggs

Step 5: Place them on kitchen towels to dry.


Photo of easter eggs in a basket

I had so much fun dyeing these Easter eggs with natural ingredients, and for those with children, this recipe will certainly make for a fun family activity. 

It’s a great way to get the kids involved in the Easter festivities, and it’s educational as well, as you’ll be able to teach your children how to dye eggs with natural ingredients such as dragon fruit and turmeric powder. Plus, it’s a good way to teach children the benefits of eggs, which are highly nutritious and are packed with vitamins A, E, D, B and K, as well as protein, iron, folic acid and more.

Close up of ramen egg

The natural ingredients we’ve used in this recipe are just one of many that can be used to dye eggs. If you’re feeling creative, you can experiment with other ingredients such as beets, blueberries, spinach, red and yellow onion skins, black coffee or even black tea, to produce a variety of colours in different shades!

Whether or not you choose to eat, display or keep these colourful eggs is up to you, but I know how I’m eating them— just as they are, with a runny centre and sprinkled with some salt and pepper. Happy Easter, everyone!

*This post is brought to you in partnership with Fermy Woźniak.

Other articles you might like:

Easter 2022 in Singapore: Hop to these restaurants for an egg-citing family meal

Have an egg-stra special Easter with Marks & Spencer’s range of tasty treats this year


Have an interesting hawker story or good food to share? Email us at [email protected]

Newest